Cover of: HIV risk behavior among injecting drug users in Amsterdam | Christina Hartgers

HIV risk behavior among injecting drug users in Amsterdam

  • 134 Pages
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by
Rodopi , Amsterdam
Infecties, Drugsverslaving, HIV, Ris
About the Edition

Het onderzoek betreft de gedragsverandering onder druggebruikers in Amsterdam vanaf het begin van de aids-epidemie, mede onder invloed van voorlichtingsactiviteiten en spuitomruilprogramma"s.

StatementChristina Hartgers
The Physical Object
Pagination134 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26328593M
ISBN 109090053441
ISBN 139789090053448
OCLC/WorldCa899055540

HIV Risk Behavior among Injecting Drug Users in Amsterdam [Hartgers, Christina] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. HIV Risk Behavior among Injecting Drug Users in Amsterdam.

HIV prevalence and risk behavior among injecting drug users who participate in "low-threshold" methadone programs in Amsterdam., an article from American Journal of Public Health, Vol 82 Issue 4 LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNTCited by: HIV prevalence and risk behavior among injecting drug users who participate in "low-threshold" methadone programs in Amsterdam.

Am J Public Health. Apr; 82 (4)– [PMC free article] Guydish JR, Abramowitz A, Woods W, Black DM, Sorensen JL. Changes in needle sharing behavior among intravenous drug users: San Francisco, Cited by: Objective: To assess levels of HIV risk behaviour in injecting drug users during and immediately following prison terms in the Netherlands.

Design: Descriptive. Setting: Municipal Health Service, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Methods: Injecting drug users taking part in a follow-up study on HIV infection were interviewed on injecting drug use and vaginal and anal sexual contact during their last Cited by: 3.

Injecting drug users are particularly vulnerable to HIV and other bloodborne infections (such as hepatitis C) as a result of sharing contaminated injecting equipment.

All drug-dependent individuals, including injecting drug users (IDUs), may be at increased risk of HIV infection because of high-risk sexual behaviors. There are an estimated While most studies of AIDS risk behavior rely on self‐reports, few studies have assessed the reliability of these reports.

The present study examines self‐reports of drug‐related and sexual risk behavior among pairs of injecting drug users (IDUs) recruited from the streets in New York City. An estimated million persons inject drugs in countries []; nearly three-quarters of these individuals live in low- and middle-income countries [].Although injection drug use directly accounts for only 5%–10% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections worldwide, this percentage increases to 30% after excluding sub-Saharan Africa [].

Description HIV risk behavior among injecting drug users in Amsterdam PDF

Effects of an intervention program on AIDS related risk behavior among injecting drug users in Puerto Rico.

Paper presented: VIIIth International Conference on AIDS. Amsterdam. Abstract PoC Colon, H., R. Robles, D. Freeman, et al. Effects of a HIV risk reduction education program among injection drug users in Puerto Rico.

See the latest data on HIV among people who inject drugs, and learn what CDC is doing to prevent HIV infections among this population. Injection Drug Use and HIV Risk Learn about the risk of getting or transmitting HIV through injection drug use, find out how to reduce the risk. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for getting HIV if they use needles, syringes, or other drug injection equipment—for example, cookers—that someone with HIV has used.

New HIV diagnoses a among PWID have declined in recent years in the 50 states and District of Columbia. The best way to reduce the risk of getting or transmitting HIV through injection drug use is to stop injecting drugs.

People who inject drugs can talk with a counselor, doctor, or other health care provider about treatment for substance use disorder, including medication-assisted treatment. All drug-dependent individuals, including injecting drug users (IDUs), may be at increased risk of HIV infection because of high-risk sexual behaviors.

There are an estimated million injecting drug users (IDUs) world-wide—78 percent of whom live in developing or transitional countries. Three hundred and eighty six injecting drug users entered into an HIV study through methadone programs over a 40 month period.

Differences in oral, intranasal and parenteral use of heroin and cocaine were assessed between four consecutive 10 month intake groups. van Ameijden EJC, Anneke MS, van den Hoek JAR, et al. Injecting risk behavior among drug users in Amsterdam, toand its relationship to AIDS prevention programs.

Am J Public Health ;   They are associated with HIV risk behaviors such as needle sharing when infected and risky sexual behaviors, and have been linked to outbreaks of HIV and viral hepatitis. People who are addicted to opioids are also at risk of turning to other ways to get the drug, including trading sex for drugs or money, which increases HIV risk.

Methamphetamine. All drug-dependent individuals, including injecting drug users (IDUs), may be at increased risk of HIV infection because of high-risk sexual behaviors. There are an estimated million injecting drug users worldwide—78 percent of whom live in developing or transitional countries (Aceijas et al., ).

Injecting drug users are particularly vulnerable to HIV and other bloodborne infections (such as hepatitis C) as a result of sharing contaminated injecting equipment. All drug-dependent individuals, including injecting drug users (IDUs), may be at increased risk of HIV infection because of high-risk sexual behaviors.

RN Bluthenthal, AH Kral, EA Erringer, BR EdlinUse of an illegal syringe exchange and injection-related risk behaviors among streetrecruited injection drug users in Oakland, California, – J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol, 18 (), pp.

Aims To study sexual risk and injecting behaviour among HIV‐infected drug users (DU) receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Design and setting As part of an ongoing prospective cohort study, HIV‐infected DU who commenced HAART (n = 67) were matched with those not starting HAART (n = ) on CD4 cell counts, duration of cohort participation, age and calendar year of visit.

Rhodes T, Singer M, Bourgois P, Friedman SR, Strathdee SA. The social structural production of HIV risk among injecting drug users.

Social Science Medicine. 61(5)– Ritson EB. Alcohol, drugs, and stigma. International Journal of Clinical Practice. –   Of new HIV infections in the United States, 8% to 12% occur in PWID, as a result of injecting or injecting in conjunction with high-risk sexual.

Details HIV risk behavior among injecting drug users in Amsterdam FB2

Specifically, several studies conducted in Eastern Europe, China, South East Asia and Russia have demonstrated that injection drug use is a key driver for the spread of HIV infections, including in Tanzania.[5–7] Some people who inject drugs (PWID) engage in HIV risk-related behaviors, such as sharing syringes and other injection equipment.

1. Introduction. Persons who inject drugs (PWID) are disproportionately affected by HIV. Although PWID who reported injecting within the past 12 months comprised injection drug use accounted for an estimated 20% of prevalent infections among persons living with diagnosed HIV infection in the United States at the.

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A1 Nonsterile injection among men and women who inject drugs and are at risk for HIV infection— National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, and 37 A2 High-risk sexual behavior among men who have sex with men and are at risk for HIV infection— National HIV. Introduction. Injecting drug users (IDU) account for the largest and an increasing proportion of AIDS cases in Italy and Spain, as many as two-thirds of persons with AIDS have been infected by injecting drugs [].IDU are also one of the populations most severely affected by the HIV epidemic.

In the mids, an HIV prevalence of over 40% were found among IDU in several western. Despite a recent reduction in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections attributed to injecting drug use in the United States, 1 9% of new U.S.

HIV infections in occurred among injecting drug users (IDUs). 2 To monitor HIV-associated behaviors and HIV prevalence among IDUs, CDC's National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS) conducts interviews and HIV.

Mental health disorders are prevalent among those initiating PrEP. We did not find increases in mental health disorders during PrEP use, but rather a decrease in sexual compulsivity and drug use disorders.

The initial prevalence of mental health disorders in our study point at the continuous need to address mental health disorders within PrEP programs. Sex related HIV risk behaviors: Differential risks among injection drug users, crack smokers, and injection drug users who smoke crack.

Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 58. Behaviors associated with drug use that are responsible for HIV transmission include shared use of injection equipment and other drug paraphernalia, and unprotected vaginal and anal intercourse with an injecting drug user.

Interventions that can reduce the prevalence of these behaviors are therefore a critical component of comprehensive AIDS prevention policy. The HIV epidemic in Russia remains concentrated mostly among injection drug users (IDUs).

Little is known about the extent to which sexual partnerships are the bridge between IDUs and the general population and create the potential for generalizing the epidemic. International studies have suggested that methadone treatment can reduce the spread of HIV among heroin-dependent drug users, if prescribed in adequate dosages (> 60 mg/day).

The Amsterdam methadone programmes, implemented in the concept of harm reduction, started in the mids with the prescription of relatively low methadone dosages (30–40 mg/day).Injection-drug users are potentially at a very high risk for infection with HIV.

How can clinicians encourage HIV testing, substance abuse counseling, and safe sex education in this vulnerable.Thailand's early cases of HIV/AIDS occurred primarily among gay men.

The virus then spread rapidly to injecting drug users (IDUs), followed by prostitutes. Between andthere were increases in HIV prevalence from 17 to 28 percent among men who have sex with men in Bangkok.

In addition, prevalence among IDUs still ranges from 30 to